Kip Moore Releases a Surprise EP, ‘Underground’

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With arguably one of the most passionate fanbases in country music, Kip Moore is in constant demand for new music. Unfortunately, the delay of Moore’s impressive sophomore album, Wild Ones, yielded much frustration from fans and an unnerving fear that the artist’s third studio release would be delayed as well. Luckily for the fans, Moore is one to always fight for them. Whether it be keeping show prices low by cutting production, trying to put an end to ticket scalping, or putting out as much music as possible — like in the 2014 Spotify release of Soundcheck, a live EP consisting of what he refers to as “underground” songs (songs that hadn’t made it onto an album but that his fans persistently requested)— Moore does what he can to make his fans feel like a priority. Heeding the pleas from his fanbase, today, October 28, Moore released a suitably named 5-song EP, Underground.

Underground opens with the most rock-infused song Moore has released thus far, “All Time Low.” Not one to be bashful about his emotions, the artist uses the song to express the frustration of a night out when you’ve hit rock bottom: “Well there’s a cover band playing nothing but happy tunes / and there’s a couple on the dance floor saying ‘baby, I love you’ / there’s a ‘Jesus saves’ carved out in the men’s bathroom stall / but I’m in need of a jukebox and a sad old country song / I’m at an all time low.” The song is a perfect anthem for when you’ve hit a rough patch in life and need to let loose.

One of the most stand-out songs on the EP is “My Kind,” which serves as a nod toward his loyal, blue-collared fans that repeatedly come to his shows. The song is made to feel as if you are at a show and he is singing right to the crowd. Known for defending his fans, “My Kind” epitomizes the dedication he has for those that follow him; within the song, Moore stands up to a rowdy concert-goer that is attempting to start trouble with his fans, effectively aligning himself with his supporters.

I think it’s time you walk out the front door / take your pride, get back in your truck / you and your mouth ain’t welcome here no more / take your hustling that got you all worked up / ‘cause there ain’t no need to get a little rowdy / settle down, we’ll have a good time / I’ll make you a promise / if you’re looking for trouble to find / you’re gonna get it from me and my kind.

The remaining three songs on the EP are live recordings and ones fans are much more familiar with. While “Separate Ways” is perhaps the newest of the three (most notably performed with Jewel at Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium in 2014), “Midnight Slow Dance” and “My Baby’s Gone” have been in his set rotation for upwards of six years.

In its entirety, the EP gives listeners a taste of the range of styles Moore explores in his writing that they wouldn’t otherwise necessarily know. There is a slight juxtaposition in the production between the studio recordings and live versions that isn’t ideal, but may have been in an effort to get the EP out as soon as possible. This aspect and the difference in song styles (rock, 80’s, country ballad) can feel rather disjointed, and makes it hard to see where an EP such as this would fit on country charts. However, while that has never seemed to be Moore’s musical focus, it was not a piece of consideration for Underground. The project accomplishes what it set out to do: simply give his “die hard” fans music to tide them over until the release of the third album. As with all of Moore’s projects, there is apparent passion in Underground, and it is sure to do well with his listeners. Underground is now available for purchase on iTunes.

To learn more about Moore and his music, visit kipmoore.net.